Physical Rehabilitation

Reduced pain. Expanded mobility. A better life. Rehabilitation with a certified practitioner.

Physical rehabilitation goals for cats and dogs include:

Increased Functionality

Rehabilitation helps a pet use all of their limbs to move around better and function more normally on a daily basis.

Decreased Pain

Rehabilitation helps reduce pain associated with injuries, chronic osteoarthritis, and surgical incisions.

Facilitated Healing

Rehabilitation can speed healing after wounds, fractures, sprains, and strains.

Sports Conditioning

Whether your pet is a pro athlete or a weekend warrior, we can help decrease their injury risk. Athletic dogs should be trained and conditioned for their specific event to prevent strains, sprains, and muscle fatigue. Sports, such as fly ball, frisbee, and agility, predispose pets to different injuries, and our veterinary professionals will determine the best conditioning protocol for your pet, depending on their particular sport. If your pet is not an athlete, they can still benefit from conditioning, since dogs who sporadically overexert themselves (i.e., on the weekends) are at high risk for injury.

Weight Loss

While an appropriate diet is paramount to an effective weight loss program, physical exercise is also important. Overweight pets need gradual conditioning to build their strength, stamina, and muscle mass. In addition to providing nutritional counseling for your overweight pet, our veterinary professionals will devise a safe exercise regimen to help them lose the extra weight. Once they reach an ideal weight, we will adjust the program to ensure they remain fit and healthy.

Physical Rehabilitation FAQs

Veterinary surgeons strive to ensure their patients return to normal function postoperatively, but if a pet doesn’t receive good aftercare, their efforts can be wasted. Physical rehabilitation helps retrain your pet’s body to function properly, so they can regain as much use as possible following their procedure.

Most senior pets have mild to severe osteoarthritis, which can make everyday movement uncomfortable or painful. Geriatric rehabilitation can help strengthen muscles, decrease pain, and improve daily function. A low intensity, life-long rehabilitation regimen is recommended for older pets.
Some diseases, such as degenerative neurological conditions, can benefit from physical rehabilitation to help pets maintain muscle mass, which can slow disease progression. Physical rehabilitation can also help pets affected by spinal cord injuries and intervertebral disc disease.
While cats aren’t as treat motivated as dogs, other techniques can be used to convince your cat to participate in physical rehabilitation. We can also teach you how to detect pain and discomfort in your naturally stoic cat.

Physical Rehabilitation FAQs

Veterinary surgeons strive to ensure their patients return to normal function postoperatively, but if a pet doesn’t receive good aftercare, their efforts can be wasted. Physical rehabilitation helps retrain your pet’s body to function properly, so they can regain as much use as possible following their procedure.

Most senior pets have mild to severe osteoarthritis, which can make everyday movement uncomfortable or painful. Geriatric rehabilitation can help strengthen muscles, decrease pain, and improve daily function. A low intensity, life-long rehabilitation regimen is recommended for older pets.
Some diseases, such as degenerative neurological conditions, can benefit from physical rehabilitation to help pets maintain muscle mass, which can slow disease progression. Physical rehabilitation can also help pets affected by spinal cord injuries and intervertebral disc disease.
While cats aren’t as treat motivated as dogs, other techniques can be used to convince your cat to participate in physical rehabilitation. We can also teach you how to detect pain and discomfort in your naturally stoic cat.